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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to the staff at the pentagon since taking office early this morning. hagel was sworn in at a private ceremony after an unusually tough confirmation fight, which ended in a 58-41 vote. hagel overcame a republican-led filibuster by members of his own party who never forgave his criticism of the iraq war. let me bring in republican strategist and former santorum senior strategist and nbc col n columnist and contributing editor for the hill. good morning. he has to confront a staggering $46 billion in cuts to military spending which are set to begin tomorrow. he's got his work cut out for him. >> he really does. part of the reason the president selected chuck hagel was knowing going forward the defense department would have to undergo cuts anyhow. obviously the sequester makes that a lot tougher process because it is, you know, these cuts are much less strategic obviously than what we would have preferred. he also comes in after having a tough few weeks, a little bloodied i think and some of that was intended not so much to go after hagel but to try to go after the president and, thankfully, the
at capitol hill, art tea talking about the impact of the budget cuts on the pentagon. in the senate they are expected to finally clear the way for confirmation vote to chuck hagel who will inherit this budget mess. janet napolitano, you see her on the right there, also speaking live at the brookings institution. and then just moments ago, we heard from a fired-up john boehner who blames the stalemate on the president and the senate. >> we have moved a bill in the house twice. we should not have a move a third bill before the senate gets off their ass and begins to do something. >> i'm joined by military analyst jack jacobs. good to see you. >> good morning. >> if lawmakers can't make this march 1st deadline, $43 billion or 8% will be slushed from the pentagon budget. they have used words like devastating, dire. are they right? how significant would this be? >> very serious indeed. these are across the board cuts. i mean, there's no intelligence or intelligent decisions made on what is going to be cut. so in addition to fact -- and there's plenty of fact -- you are going to cut ammun
chief pentagon correspondent jim maiklaszewski joins us now. what do we know? >> it's a tragic story in so many ways. this marine corps reservist, a 25-year-old by the name of eddie ray routh, is in custody facing two capital murder charges in the deaths of that former navy s.e.a.l. sniper, chris kyle, and a friend. but the police still cannot pinpoint a motive. now, friends say that it appeared that routh was suffering ptsd, post-traumatic stress, from his service in iraq, and kyle has a record of working directly with ptsd victims from the wars in iraq and afghanistan, and trying to help them. now, according to reports, this was the first time that kyle and his friend had ever met with routh and they were at a gun range about 50 miles outside of ft. worth saturday when suddenly without warning, routh allegedly pulled a hand gun and shot and killed both of the other men at point-blank range. he's in custody and there is reports that he had to be tasered in his cell overnight for some kind of disruption there in the texas jail, but the search is on for a motive. and i can tell you th
to most americans has really grown exponentially. ten years ago the pentagon had 50 drones. today it's 7,500. a third of the air force's fleet unmanned. u.s. military carried out 447 drone attacks in afghanistan in the first 11 months in 2012. 294 total in all of 2011. what's behind this drone explosion, if you will? >> well, i think that drones are sort of irresistible for a policymaker, for a president who is worried about protecting the country but also, you know, a president who in many ways was formed politically by the experiences in iraq and afghanistan, at least as far as his foreign policy views, who doesn't want to see dangerous, costly, bloody military entanglements in far away nations. drones are surgical. they're cheap. you can have a pretty high degree of accuracy. it is true that there have been numerous civilian casualties, but relative to any other technology we have short of sending in, you know, an assassin with a sniper rifle which in many cases just isn't practical, drones are the best way to sort of take the enemy off the battlefield. they don't cost a lot of money.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)